Research (Part Two)

The Playing Audience Research

Her Story by Sam Barlow

Her Story by Sam Barlow

Her story was a video game by Sam Barlow. It was a crime fiction game with non-linear storytelling. Her Story revolves around a police data base full of live video footage. It granted players access to a police database of archived video footage that covers seven interviews from 1994 in which a British woman is interviewed by detectives about her missing husband. Players take on the role of the person sat before a police computer terminal, their own computer or device playing the part of the fictional computer. They type search queries and the database returns clips of the answers where the woman speaks those words. Sam Barlow stated "At times it can feel like you're engaged in a genuine dialogue with this woman and her story. It's a unique way to interact with a narrative, a sculptural way of viewing a story- and something that can only be done interactively." Referring to the use of live action video in the game, a novelty in modern video games he said "I'm interested in showing that accessible technologies such as a video offer a powerful way for indie games to showcase a performance. I am also putting the spotlight on the modern phenomena of the Youtube Jury, in which police forces distribute the footage of intimate suspect interviews for detectives to dissect." 

Details

Paris Texas

Samorost by Jakub Dvorsky

Samorost is a puzzle point-and-click adventure game developed by Amanita Design. The first game of the Samorost series, it was released in 2003 for free at the Amanita Design website. Samorost was created by Jakub Dvorsky. Although short and simplistic in its gameplay,its surreal graphics and memorable score made the game stand out. The object of the game is to avert a collision between the gnome's home planet and a large incoming spaceship. The player interacts with the world  with simple point and click interface directing a small, white-clad humanoid with a little cap and brown boots called "gnome". The goal of the Samorost games is to solve a series of puzzles and brain teasers. the puzzles are sequentially linked forming an adventure story. The game contains no inventory or dialogue, and the solving of puzzles will immediately transport the player character to the next screen.

The game features surrealistic, organic scenarios that mix natural technological concepts (often featuring manipulated photographs of small objects made to look very large), creative character designs and a unique musical atmosphere.

 

http://amanita-design.net/samorost-1/

 

Details

Samorost by Jakub Dvorsky

Details

Facts on King's Cross

The Numbers:

  • King's Cross station has 11 platforms and sees over 50 million commuters per year.
  • The land's original cost was £65,000 and the construction costing £123,000.
  • The estimated cost to renovate the station in 2008 was £650 million.
  • King's Cross St Pancras Tube station is served by six different lines (the most lines out of all the other underground stations).
  • Alison Wertheimer wrote in 2001 that there were 100-150 suicides annually on the underground. In 2011, figures for the decade were released by TFL. The rate had gone up to 80 per year, as compared with 46 in the year 2000, and this was attributed to the financial crisis. The worst affected station was King's Cross.

The Origins:

  • King's Cross has been a place of trade since the Roman times.
  • The modern site of King's Cross lays approximately 2km north-west of the Roman settlement of Londonium.
  • Archaeological excavations carried out in the area suggest that this point served as a crossing of the Fleet River.
  • The area is also traditionally recognized as the location of the legendary battle between Boudica, The Warriors Queen of the Iceni, against the Roman invades in AD61. It is believed that Boudica's remains rest under platform
  • 9 at King's Cross Station. After her death, the crossing over the Fleet River was renamed battle Bridge.
Details
Details

The Princess and the Pea by Lauren Child

In Lauren Child's illustrated book The Princess and the Pea  she created individual "rooms" which were then photographed by Polly Borland. Each set is lit using delicate doll's house lights to create atmosphere and drama. "I imagined the princess living in a tree house so i decided to line her bedroom with wood- actually it is a mount-board, scored and painted with trips on the ceiling overlapping to give the effect of clapboard. The inspiration for the bed and the room came from a photograph I found in a copy of "interiors" magazine"

Lauren created "wood paneling" for these room sets from mount board and cereal packages: "once painted you believe them to be wood". Lauren furnished the rooms with objects made by specialist crafts people and pieces that she made herself. The curtains are made from photocopied fabric- "fabric is tricky to manipulate and so it was easier to work with paper. The characters are drawn and dressed in layers on folded paper."

Details

The Princess and the Pea by Lauren Child

Details

Frances Glessner Lee

Details

Frances Glessner Lee

Frances Glessner Lee was a millionaire heiress who revolutionized the study of crime scene investigation. She founded Harvard's department of legal medicine, the first program in the nation for forensic pathology. 

She was inspired by a classmate of her brother George Burgess Magarth. Who was studying medicine at Harvard Medical school and was particularly interested in death investigation. Through the 1940s and 50s, Lee hosted a series of semi-annual "Nutshell studies of unexplained death". 30 or 40 leading crime scene investigators would be invited to a two week- long conference, where she would present them with an intricately constructed  diorama of actual crime scenes, complete with working doors windows and lights. They would have 90 minutes to study the scene. The week culminated in a banquet at the Kite Carlton. The 18 dioramas are still used for training purposes by Harvard associates in Police science. 

Details

Frances Glessner Lee

Details

Comments


    Add comment

    Fields marked by '*' are required.
    Comments are moderated. If you choose to make this comment public, it will not be visible to others until it is approved by the owner.